What should I read this Halloween? Part 2

After a successful Halloween Horror event at Warwick Arts Centre featuring David Moody, Adam Nevill and Gary McMahon we’re back with part two of our Halloween recommendations. Remember, this series will be running for the entire week, with a new part released every day.

Graham Masterton recommends:

11. The Process by Brion Gysin

 

 

 

 

 

 

12. The Man with the Golden Arm by Nelson Algren: “A tough, dark novel set in the Polish quarter of Chicago immediately after World War Two. The title character is Francis Macjinek ‘Frankie Machine’ who is a poker dealer and jazz drummer. Frankie has shrapnel in his liver and becomes addicted to the morphine he uses to kill the pain. One day he accidentally kills his connection, Nifty Louie, and goes on the run. Eventually, he loses touch with the love of his life, Molly-O, and has to go on the run again. Full of despair, he hangs himself. Not a very cheerful story altogether, but amazingly well written by Nelson Algren who also wrote A Walk on the Wide Side.” Graham Masterton

 

 

13. Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read Horror recommends:

14. The Manitou by Graham Masterton: “No nonsense  horror that mixes Native American mythology with slow slabs of suspense.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alan Kelly recommends:

15. Cruddy by Lynda Barry: “Lynda Barry’s illustrated novel is a dark fable narrated by a suicidal misfit who offers the reader a lurid and vicious account of the trauma she endured at the hands of a murderous father. I re-read this book at least once a year and it’s my favourite coming-of-age novel, or maybe a better description would be coming-of-rage.” Alan Kelly
 

 

 

 

16. Exquisite Corpse by Poppy Z Brite: “Necrophilia, cannibalism and hardcore gay sex with scenes of ultra-violence which would make David Cronenberg’s stomach turn over! I’m so disappointed that Brite moved away from dark literature and I’ve yet to read a novel which rival’s this!” Alan Kelly
 

 

 

 

 

17. Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman: “There is something magical about Gaiman’s work and this is one of his best! Another novel I return to again and again, outstanding!” Alan Kelly

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read Horror recommends:

18. Let Me Die A Woman by Alan Kelly: “Beautifully trashy B movie pulp, in equal parts hilarious, camp and gory.”

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